Sensible advice for aches, pains & injuries

Plantar Fasciitis Patients Have Thick Soles

There’s a connection between plantar fasciitis and a surprisingly thick tissue in the arch of the foot

updated (first published 2007)
by Paul Ingraham, Vancouver, Canadabio
I am a science writer and a former Registered Massage Therapist with a decade of experience treating tough pain cases. I was the Assistant Editor of for several years. I’ve written hundreds of articles and several books, and I’m known for readable but heavily referenced analysis, with a touch of sass. I am a runner and ultimate player. • more about memore about

EXCERPT This short article is an except of’s ridiculously detailed tutorial about plantar fasciitis.

When you are frustrated with a chronic condition like endless foot pain, sometimes you start to second-guess whether you really have what you think you have. Uncertainty about the diagnosis can be almost as frustrating as the pain itself. In fact, there’s excellent evidence (and it just makes sense) that feeling more confident about the nature of pain can reduce pain.1

Sometimes there’s no way out of that uncertainty … and sometimes there is.

Eureka! Unusually clear plantar fasciitis science

By 2012, several studies had shown that, yes, the sole of your foot really is thicker — a lot thicker — when you have plantar fasciitis.234 A 2012 study confirmed that using ultrasound to detect this is reliable: different technicians will get the same results.5 A 2014 meta-analysis reviewing all these and more and concluded:6

Ultrasound can be considered a reliable imaging technique for assessing plantar fascia thickness, monitoring the effect of different interventions and guiding therapeutic interventions in patients with plantar fasciitis.

Such decisive conclusions are refreshing in medical science, which is usually murkier. Many such correlations are clinically meaningless, and the reliability of a lot of testing is amazingly poor.7 This is a noteworthy case of firm ground! (Interpretation is another matter. See below.)

The evidence also shows a connection between the thickening and flat feet.8 Flat feet, thick soles, and plantar fasciitis all tend to go together. Interesting.

Chances are good that your plantar fascia is more than twice as thick as it should be.

So, if you have plantar fasciitis, chances are good that your plantar fascia is more than twice as thick as it should be: a nice clear physical sign that can be diagnosed with ultrasonography. (Not by feel, mind you.9) If you’d like to confirm this, all you have to do is bring it to your doctor’s attention and request ultrasound confirmation that you have “thick feet.” If your doctor is skeptical, show them the footnotes!

What does it all mean? Interpreting a thick plantar fascia

This evidence does not show anything about causation. The research has not confirmed that a thickened plantar fascia causes plantar fasciitis — just that they definitely tend to occur together.

It’s quite plausible that the thickened fascia is a symptom of the condition. That is, excessive loading on the arch builds up the tissue, much like a callous. Or the thickening could be, counterintuitively, a sign of weakness, thicker but not necessarily stronger— an abnormal plantar fascia that can’t handle the load.10

Other benefits of ultrasound

Examining your foot with ultrasound might turn up some other obvious cause of your pain — something interesting, other than a thickened plantar fascia. But take this with a grain of salt. Good scientific evidence has confirmed a strong correlation between thickened fascia and plantar fasciitis. But, as already discussed, other seemingly obvious issues like heel spurs do not necessarily explain anything!

For instance, we know that you can’t use X-ray and the presence of heel spurs in quite the same way to confirm your plantar fasciitis diagnosis, because heel spurs are often found in people with plantar fasciitis, but lots of people have heels spurs without plantar fasciitis. So, knowing that you have heel spurs alone doesn’t tell you all that much. If you have pain on the bottom of your foot and heel spurs and a thickened fascia confirmed by ultrasound … then, hoo boy, you’ve got a lot wrong with your foot, and a plantar fasciitis diagnosis is probably correct … but possibly not the only cause of pain.

For much (much much much) more information, see my advanced tutorial covering pretty much every imaginable thing about dealing with the condition:

Most plantar fasciitis can be cured!

Sadly, few patients ever get good advice. offers an incredibly detailed plantar fasciitis tutorial that is the last thing you’ll ever have to read on the subject. Find out exactly which treatments are proven to work — and which ones aren’t, all based on more than 150 footnotes and clearly annotated references to the scientific literature. Add it to your shopping cart now ($19.95) or read the first few sections for free!

About Paul Ingraham

Headshot of Paul Ingraham, short hair, neat beard, suit jacket.

I am a science writer, former massage therapist, and I was the assistant editor at for several years. I have had my share of injuries and pain challenges as a runner and ultimate player. My wife and I live in downtown Vancouver, Canada. See my full bio and qualifications, or my blog, Writerly. You might run into me on Facebook or Twitter.


  1. Modern pain science shows that pain is an unpredictable sensation thoroughly controlled by the brain and not as closely related to tissue trouble as most people assume. So can we think pain away? Probably not, but we may be able to influence it. For more information, see Pain is Weird: Pain science reveals a volatile, misleading sensation that is often more than just a symptom, and sometimes worse than whatever started it. BACK TO TEXT
  2. Karabay N, Toros T, Hurel C. Ultrasonographic evaluation in plantar fasciitis. J Foot Ankle Surg. 2007;46(6):442–446.

    These researchers used ultrasonography to show that people with plantar fasciitis have thickened connective tissue on the bottom of their feet. The results were clear and unambiguous — a rare bit of clarity in a murky subject!

  3. Mahowald S, Legge BS, Grady JF. The correlation between plantar fascia thickness and symptoms of plantar fasciitis. J Am Podiatr Med Assoc. 2011;101(5):385–9. PubMed #21957269.

    In 39 feet, both increasing and decreasing pain correlated well with changes in plantar fascia thickness, assessed with ultrasonography. The authors conclude that their study “provides evidence that changing thickness of the plantar fascia is a valid objective.”

  4. Wearing SC, Smeathers JE, Sullivan PM, et al. Plantar fasciitis: are pain and fascial thickness associated with arch shape and loading? Phys Ther. 2007;87(8):1002–1008. PubMed #17553919. PainSci #55823.

    In this tiny study of 10 feet with plantar fasciitis, compared to 10 perfectly fine feet, “thicker fascial structures were associated with lower arched feet but only in individuals with heel pain.”

  5. Cheng JW, Tsai WC, Yu TY, Huang KY. Reproducibility of sonographic measurement of thickness and echogenicity of the plantar fascia. J Clin Ultrasound. 2012 Jan;40(1):14–9. PubMed #22109854.

    Based on 56 feet, 20 with inferior heel pain, researchers concluded that “the reliability of sonographic examination of the thickness of the plantar fascia is high,” with no advantage to a transverse scan.

  6. Mohseni-Bandpei MA, Nakhaee M, Mousavi ME, et al. Application of ultrasound in the assessment of plantar fascia in patients with plantar fasciitis: a systematic review. Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. 2014 Aug;40(8):1737–54. PubMed #24798393. BACK TO TEXT
  7. PS Ingraham. Is Diagnosis for Pain Problems Reliable? Reliability science shows that health professionals can’t agree on many popular theories about why you’re in pain. 2050 words. BACK TO TEXT
  8. Huang YC, Wang LY, Wang HC, Chang KL, Leong CP. The relationship between the flexible flatfoot and plantar fasciitis: ultrasonographic evaluation. Chang Gung J Med. 2004 Jun;27(6):443–8. PubMed #15455545.

    From the abstract: “There was a higher incidence of plantar fasciitis in the flexible flatfoot group than the normal arch control group in this study.”

  9. The thickness of the plantar fasciitis is not something you’ll be able to detect with your digits. This is a super thin structure to begin with. Even tripling its thickness would not make a palpable difference, any more than you feel the difference between three layers of Saran Wrap instead of one … through the thick skin of the foot. This is something you’re only going to see with ultrasound. BACK TO TEXT
  10. Wearing et al: “assuming that fascial thickness reflects tensile loading, it would appear that the plantar fascia of individuals with heel pain either are exposed to greater internal loading, resulting in adaptive thickening, or are inherently thickened but incapable of tolerating normal tensile load, resulting in pain.” BACK TO TEXT