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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Dear 2015.

Online tutorials for chronic pain reduced pain, anxiety, disability

updated
Dear BF, Gandy M, Karin E, Staples LG, Johnston L, Fogliati V, Wootton BM, Terides MD, Kayrouz R, Perry KN, Sharpe L, Nicholas MK, Titov N. The Pain Course: A Randomised Controlled Trial Examining an Internet-Delivered Pain Management Program when Provided with Different Levels of Clinician Support. Pain. 2015 May. PubMed #26039902.
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PainSci summary of Dear 2015?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★★★?5-star ratings are for sentinel studies, excellent experiments with meaningful results. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

Researchers tested a series of web-based pain management tutorials on a group of adults who had been suffering symptoms for more than six months. Regardless of how much contact the patients had with clinicians, they all experienced significant reductions in disability, anxiety, and average pain levels at the end of the eight week experiment as well as three months down the line.

It’s hard to imagine study results any more in harmony with my business model. 😃

“While face-to-face pain management programs are important, many adults with chronic pain can benefit from programs delivered via the internet, and many of them do not need a lot of contact with a clinician in order to benefit.”

~ Paul Ingraham

original abstract

The present study evaluated an internet-delivered pain management program, the Pain Course, when provided with different levels of clinician support. Participants (n = 490) were randomised to one of four groups: (1) Regular Contact (n = 143), (2) Optional Contact (n = 141), (3) No Contact (n = 131), and (4) a treatment-as-usual Waitlist-Control Group (n = 75). The treatment program was based on the principles of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and comprised 5 internet-delivered lessons provided over 8 weeks. The three Treatment Groups reported significant improvements (between-groups Cohen's d; avg. reduction) in disability (ds ≥ 0.50; avg. reduction ≥ 18%), anxiety (ds ≥ .44; avg. reduction ≥ 32%), depression (ds ≥ 0.73; avg. reduction ≥ 36%) and average pain (ds ≥ 0.30; avg. reduction ≥ 12%) immediately post-treatment, which were sustained at or further improved to 3-month follow-up. High treatment completion rates and levels of satisfaction were reported and no marked or consistent differences were observed between the Treatment Groups. The mean clinician time per participant was 67.69 minutes (SD = 33.50), 12.85 minutes (SD = 24.61) and 5.44 minutes (SD = 12.38) for those receiving regular contact, the option of contact and no clinical contact, respectively. These results highlight the very significant public health potential of carefully designed and administered internet-delivered pain management programs and indicate that these programs can be successfully administered with several levels of clinical support.This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial No Derivatives 3.0 License, which permits downloading and sharing the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially.

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This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog.