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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Coste 1994.

Unusually high rate of recovery from low back pain

updated
Coste J, Delecoeuillerie G, Cohen de Lara A, Le Parc JM, Paolaggi JB. Clinical course and prognostic factors in acute low back pain: an inception cohort study in primary care practice. BMJ. 1994;308:577–80.
Tags: back pain, sciatica, neurology, good news, stats, pain problems, spine, butt, hip, scientific medicine

PainSci summary of Coste 1994?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for typical studies with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

This paper presents some unusually optimistic old data about low back pain recovery: in a sample of about 100 patients, “90% of patients recovered within two weeks and only two developed chronic low back pain,” which is “much higher than reported in other studies,” but the authors suggest some good reasons why their number makes sense.

original abstract

OBJECTIVE: To describe the natural course of recent acute low back pain in terms of both morbidity (pain, disability) and absenteeism from work and to evaluate the prognostic factors for these outcomes.

DESIGN: Inception cohort study.

SETTING: Primary care.

PATIENTS: 103 patients with acute localised non-specific back pain lasting less than 72 hours.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Complete recovery (disappearance of both pain and disability) and return to work.

RESULTS: 90% of patients recovered within two weeks and only two developed chronic low back pain. Only 49 of 100 patients for whom data were available had bed rest and 40% of 75 employed patients lost no time from work. Proportional hazards regression analysis showed that previous chronic episodes of low back pain, initial disability level, initial pain worse when standing, initial pain worse when lying, and compensation status were significantly associated with delayed episode recovery.These factors were also related to abseteeism from work. Absenteeism from work was also influenced by job satisfaction and gender.

CONCLUSIONS: The recovery rate from acute low back pain was much higher than reported in other studies. Those studies, however, did not investigate groups of patients enrolled shortly after the onset of symptoms and often mixed acute low back pain patients with patients with exacerbations of chronic pain or sciatica. Several sociodemographic and clinical factors were of prognostic value in acute low back pain. Factors which incluenced the outcome in terms of episode recovery (mainly physical severity factors) were only partly predictive of absenteeism from work. Time off work and return to work depended more on sociodemographic and job related incluences.

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These two articles on PainScience.com cite Coste 1994 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: