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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Tajari 2010.

L-glutamine for muscle soreness after exercise

updated
Tajari SN, Rezaeee M, Gheidi N. Assessment of the effect of L-glutamine supplementation on DOMS. Br J Sports Med. 2010;44.
Tags: treatment, nutrition, exercise, chronic pain, self-treatment, pain problems

PainSci summary of Tajari 2010?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★☆☆☆?2-star ratings are for studies with flaws, bias, and/or conflict of interest; published in lesser journals. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

“These results suggest that L-glutamine supplementation attenuates DOMS effects, muscle damage and downfall of performance in flexor of hip.” However, it’s a weak study, and I don’t think the results do much more than “suggest”: it was a small experiment, and they measured range of motion only (not pain or strength, both of which would have been better choices — DOMS does not particularly limit range of motion, just makes it uncomfortable). Nevertheless, this is a shred of evidence that glutamine might, possibly, help with DOMS a little.

original abstract

Glutamine is an amino acid and is not considered one of the eight essential aminos. Amino acid supplementation outspreaded to enhancing athletic performance, preparation, removal fatigue and minimising risk of injures. Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is result of a combination of unaccustomed muscle contraction (especially lengthening of the muscle under load) and poor motor neuron recruitment. This study investigated the effect of L-glutamine supplementation on DOMS after 30 min ergometric exercise by comparing two metabolic enzymes (aldolase and creatine kinase) and hip flexors range of motion. Experimental double blind design was used. This study included 20 non-athletic girl with 22.8±2.6 years old and 21.45±3.1 body mass index. The subjects randomise to glutamine and placebo supplementations. The supplement group was ingested 4 weeks, three times in week and twice a day (5 g per time). The control group use placebo same as experimental group. analyses of variance and t test use for data analyses. Aldolase increased 36 h after activity than after activity time in experimental group, but in control group it was reverted. There is a significant difference in aldolase level between control and experimental group (p> 0.05). The creatine kinase increased significantly in 36 h after activity than after activity time in experimental group. Range of motion of hip joint decreased in T3 in both of them significantly, but it was recovered for experimental group 36 h after activity. These results suggest that L-glutamine supplementation attenuates DOMS effects, muscle damage and downfall of performance in flexor of hip.

related content

These two articles on PainScience.com cite Tajari 2010 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: