Weekly nuggets of pain science news and insight, usually 100-300 words, with the occasional longer post. The blog is the “director’s commentary” on the core content of PainScience.com: a library of major articles and books about common painful problems and popular treatments. See the blog archives or updates for the whole site.

Another new “finally” article

Paul Ingraham

The tech blog Daring Fireball has a running joke about overuse of the word “finally” in reference to anything Apple does, and the sarcastic “finally” has become a minor meme (enough for a T-shirt anyway). But of course sometimes things really are overdue, like my recent new article about massage and circulation, and another one published yesterday: finally, a guide to Achilles tendinitis.

Three of my friends have asked for help with this in the last month. And I have this condition myself: I’ve been battling it off and on for about a decade. So it really felt like it was time, and I just went for it, ignoring countless other priorities to do something that wasn’t even technically on my to-do list (even though I’ve had in mind since basically the beginning, just like the circulation article).

I’m pleased with how rapidly I can use the tools I’ve built over the years to produce a surprisingly good quality article in less than a day. Although it’s pretty basic so far, just a review of the treatment options, it already seems more thorough and evidence-based than a great deal of the competition.

And, speaking of the competition, there’s sure a lot of it: “Achilles tendinitis” is a smoking hot keyword in Google search. Ranking in those results seems like a huge challenge. Every major medical information site has a page dedicated to this injury, and countless other private sites do too. And yet, predictably, the overwhelming majority of them are pretty simplistic. I’ll be quite interested to see how quickly and far my page rises through the ranks of the search results.

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