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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Williams 1990.

Use of intermittent stretch in the prevention of serial sarcomere loss in immobilised muscle

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Tags: stretch, sedentariness, etiology, biology, biomechanics, exercise, self-treatment, treatment, muscle, pro

PainSci summary of Williams 1990?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focussed on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for typical studies with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

If muscles are not used, and ROM is lessened, can stretching assist in returning ROM to normal? “It was found that periods of stretch as short as 1/2 h daily were sufficient not only to prevent loss of sarcomeres but actually to cause an increase in the number of sarcomeres in series.”

original abstract

After immobilisation of muscle in a shortened position there is a reduction of muscle fibre length due to a loss of serial sarcomeres. Experiments have been carried out to determine whether short, daily periods of stretch prevent sarcomere loss and the resultant loss of range of joint motion. It was found that periods of stretch as short as 1/2 h daily were sufficient not only to prevent loss of sarcomeres but actually to cause an increase in the number of sarcomeres in series. Range of joint motion was normal. Such short periods of stretch were also found to prevent much of the muscle atrophy normally associated with immobilisation in the shortened position.

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This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog.