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bibliography*The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Verdejo 2004.

Heel-shoe interactions and the durability of EVA foam running-shoe midsoles

updated


Tags: running, biomechanics, IT band pain, patellar pain, plantar fasciitis, shin pain, devices, foot, exercise, self-treatment, treatment, etiology, pro, knee, leg, limbs, pain problems, overuse injury, injury, tendinosis, arthritis, aging

PainSci summary of Verdejo 2004?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for typical studies with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

Science news flash! Shoes wear out: “Scanning electron microscopy shows that structural damage (wrinkling of faces and some holes) occurred in the foam after 750 km run. Fatigue of the foam reduces heelstrike cushioning, and is a possible cause of running injuries.”

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

A finite element analysis (FEA) was made of the stress distribution in the heelpad and a running shoe midsole, using heelpad properties deduced from published force-deflection data, and measured foam properties. The heelpad has a lower initial shear modulus than the foam (100 vs. 1050 kPa), but a higher bulk modulus. The heelpad is more non-linear, with a higher Ogden strain energy function exponent than the foam (30 vs. 4). Measurements of plantar pressure distribution in running shoes confirmed the FEA. The peak plantar pressure increased on average by 100% after 500 km run. Scanning electron microscopy shows that structural damage (wrinkling of faces and some holes) occurred in the foam after 750 km run. Fatigue of the foam reduces heelstrike cushioning, and is a possible cause of running injuries.

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These five articles on PainScience.com cite Verdejo 2004 as a source:

This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: