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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Tennant 2001.

Patello-femoral tracking in the weight-bearing knee: a study of asymptomatic volunteers utilising dynamic magnetic resonance imaging: a preliminary report

updated
Tennant S, Williams A, Vedi V, Kinmont C, Gedroyc W, Hunt DM. Patello-femoral tracking in the weight-bearing knee: a study of asymptomatic volunteers utilising dynamic magnetic resonance imaging: a preliminary report. Knee Surg Sports Traumatol Arthrosc. 2001;9(3):155–162.
Tags: patellar pain, running, knee, surgery, arthritis, aging, pain problems, leg, limbs, overuse injury, injury, exercise, self-treatment, treatment

PainSci summary of Tennant 2001?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible.

From the abstract: “These results indicate that mild lateral tilting and displacement can be normal phenomena in the weight-bearing knee in early flexion and should not necessarily be taken as evidence of abnormal tracking in symptomatic patients.”

original abstract

Normal patello-femoral tracking is not well defined, and conventional radiological techniques do not allow imaging in the physiological, weight-bearing stance. A vertical-access open configuration magnetic resonance scanner allows imaging of patello-femoral tracking during weight-bearing and through a wide range of knee flexion. We imaged 40 asymptomatic knees in this way, producing axial scans which were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using sulcus angle, congruence angle, lateral patello-femoral angle and patellar centralisation, to assess patellar tilt and displacement. Mild lateral tilting in hyperextension with the quadriceps relaxed was seen, but quantitative assessment of this was impeded by internal rotation of the femur in extension. One-half of the knees were slightly laterally displaced in hyper-extension, becoming central during the first 30 degrees of knee flexion. During passive flexion of the knee in a seated position, fewer knees were laterally tilted or displaced, and no consistent change was seen during flexion. These results indicate that mild lateral tilting and displacement can be normal phenomena in the weight-bearing knee in early flexion and should not necessarily be taken as evidence of abnormal tracking in symptomatic patients. Lateral to medial movement of the patella occurs during normal knee flexion. In addition, imaging in the weight-bearing knee can provide valuable information not gained by imaging during passive knee flexion.

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These two articles on PainScience.com cite Tennant 2001 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: