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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Swenson 2003.

Spinal manipulative therapy for low back pain

updated
Swenson R, Haldeman S. Spinal manipulative therapy for low back pain. Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. 2003 Jul-Aug;11(4):228–37. PubMed #12889861.
Tags: back pain, chiropractic, spinal adjustment, treatment, pain problems, spine, manual therapy, controversy, debunkery

PainSci summary of Swenson 2003?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible.

From the abstract: “Most reviews of these trials indicate that spinal manipulative therapy provides some short-term benefit to patients, especially with acute low back pain.”

original abstract

Growing interest in complementary and alternative medicine in the United States has been paralleled by increased use of spinal manipulative therapy in an attempt to manage symptoms of low back pain, spinal stenosis, and spondylolisthesis. Chiropractors have been the main practitioners of spinal manipulative therapy, with osteopaths and physical therapists providing a smaller fraction of these services. Theories explaining the mode of action of spinal manipulative therapy are largely preliminary and have focused on the mechanical effects of manipulative forces on the spine and neurologic responses to manipulation. The effects of spinal manipulation on patients with both acute and chronic low back pain have been investigated in randomized clinical trials. Most reviews of these trials indicate that spinal manipulative therapy provides some short-term benefit to patients, especially with acute low back pain.

related content

One article on PainScience.com cites Swenson 2003 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog.