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Sitting behaviour is not associated with incident diabetes over 13 years: the Whitehall II cohort study

updated
Stamatakis E, Pulsford RM, Brunner EJ, Britton AR, Bauman AE, Biddle SJ, Hillsdon M. Sitting behaviour is not associated with incident diabetes over 13 years: the Whitehall II cohort study. Br J Sports Med. 2017 May;51(10):818–823. PubMed #28465446.
Tags: random, sedentariness, medicine

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

BACKGROUND: Although certain types of sedentary behaviour have been linked to metabolic risk, prospective studies describing the links between sitting with incident diabetes are scarce and often do not account for baseline adiposity. We investigate the associations between context-specific sitting and incident diabetes in a cohort of mid-aged to older British civil servants.

METHODS: Using data from the Whitehall II study (n=4811), Cox proportional hazards models (adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, employment grade, smoking, alcohol intake, fruit and vegetable consumption, self-rated health, physical functioning, walking and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, and body mass index (BMI)) were fitted to examine associations between total sitting and context-specific sitting time (work, television (TV), non-TV leisure time sitting at home) at phase 5 (1997-1999) and fasting glucose-defined incident diabetes up to 2011.

RESULTS: Total sitting (HR of the top compared with the bottom group: 1.26; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.62; p=0.01) and TV sitting (1.33; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.88; p=0.05) showed associations with incident diabetes; once BMI was included in the model these associations were attenuated for both total sitting (1.19; 95% CI 0.92 to 1.55; p=0.22) and TV sitting (1.31; 95% CI 0.96 to 1.76; p=0.14).

CONCLUSION: We found limited evidence linking sitting and incident diabetes over 13 years in this occupational cohort of civil servants.

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