Pain Science.com •Sensible advice for aches, pains & injuries
 
bibliography

Comparing yoga, exercise, and a self-care book for chronic low back pain: a randomized, controlled trial

added Mar 25, 07 • updated Aug 18, 15
Sherman KJ, Cherkin DC, Erro J, Miglioretti DL, Deyo RA. Comparing yoga, exercise, and a self-care book for chronic low back pain: a randomized, controlled trial. Ann Intern Med. 2005 Dec;143(12):849–856. PubMed #16365466.
Tags: back pain, exercise, mind, pain problems, spine, self-treatment, treatment

PainSci summary of Sherman 2005 ★★★★☆?4-star ratings are for larger and better studies and reviews published in more prestigious journals, with only quibbles. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

From the abstract: “Yoga was more effective than a self-care book for improving function and reducing chronic low back pain, and the benefits persisted for at least several months.” However, it was not more effective than a “conventional therapeutic exercise class.”

Note that the authors conducted a similar study in 2011, comparing yoga and stretching classes, with essentially identical results: see Sherman for more detail.

~ Paul Ingraham

original abstract

BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain is a common problem that has only modestly effective treatment options.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether yoga is more effective than conventional therapeutic exercise or a self-care book for patients with chronic low back pain.

DESIGN: Randomized, controlled trial.

SETTING: A nonprofit, integrated health care system.

PATIENTS: 101 adults with chronic low back pain.

INTERVENTION: 12-week sessions of yoga or conventional therapeutic exercise classes or a self-care book.

MEASUREMENTS: Primary outcomes were back-related functional status (modified 24-point Roland Disability Scale) and "bothersomeness" of pain (11-point numerical scale). The primary time point was 12 weeks. Clinically significant change was considered to be 2.5 points on the functional status scale and 1.5 points on the bothersomeness scale. Secondary outcomes were days of restricted activity, general health status, and medication use.

RESULTS: After adjustment for baseline values, back-related function in the yoga group was superior to the book and exercise groups at 12 weeks (yoga vs. book: mean difference, -3.4 [95% CI, -5.1 to - 1.6] [P < 0.001]; yoga vs. exercise: mean difference, -1.8 [CI, -3.5 to - 0.1] [P = 0.034]). No significant differences in symptom bothersomeness were found between any 2 groups at 12 weeks; at 26 weeks, the yoga group was superior to the book group with respect to this measure (mean difference, -2.2 [CI, -3.2 to - 1.2]; P < 0.001). At 26 weeks, back-related function in the yoga group was superior to the book group (mean difference, -3.6 [CI, -5.4 to - 1.8]; P < 0.001).

LIMITATIONS: Participants in this study were followed for only 26 weeks after randomization. Only 1 instructor delivered each intervention.

CONCLUSIONS: Yoga was more effective than a self-care book for improving function and reducing chronic low back pain, and the benefits persisted for at least several months.

related content

These two articles on PainScience.com cite Sherman 2005 as a source:

This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a specialized blog. You can search & browse the whole thing.