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Kinesio taping and jump performance in elite female track and field athletes and jump performance in elite female track and field athletes

PainSci » bibliography » Schiffer et al 2015
updated
Tags: taping, controversy, debunkery, devices, treatment

One article on PainSci cites Schiffer 2015: The Dubious Science of Kinesiology Tape

original abstract Abstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

CONTEXT: The application of kinesio tape (KT) to lower-extremity muscles as an ergogenic aid to improve muscle-strength-related parameters such as jumping is controversial. OBJECTIVE: To test the hypothesis that the application of KT enhances the jumping performance of healthy uninjured elite female track and field athletes. DESIGN: A double 1-legged jump test was performed before and after the application of blue K-Active tape without traction on the maximally stretched gastrocnemius, hamstrings, rectus femoris, and iliopsoas muscles according to the generally accepted technique. PARTICIPANTS: 18 German elite female track and field athletes (age 21 ± 2 y, height 172 ± 4 cm, body mass 62 ± 5 kg, active time in their sport 13 ± 4 y). RESULTS: Factorial analysis of variance with repeated measures (ANOVA, Bonferroni) revealed no significant differences in jumping performance between the tests (P > .05, d = 0.26). CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the application of KT has no influence on jumping performance in healthy, uninjured female elite athletes. The authors do not recommend the use of KT for the purpose of improving jump performance.

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