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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Roth 2003.

Insomnia: epidemiology, characteristics, and consequences

updated
Roth T, Roehrs T. Insomnia: epidemiology, characteristics, and consequences. Clin Cornerstone. 2003;5(3):5–15. PubMed #14626537.
Tags: chronic pain, sleep, random, mind, muscle pain, pain problems, muscle

PainSci summary of Roth 2003?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focussed on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★☆☆☆?2-star ratings are for studies with glaring flaws, bias, and/or conflict of interest, lesser journals. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

From the abstract: “Chronic insomnia is associated with absenteeism, frequent accidents, memory impairment, and greater health care utilization. The most consistent impact of insomnia is a high risk of depression.”

~ Paul Ingraham

original abstract

Insomnia is a symptom of difficulty initiating and maintaining sleep or experiencing nonrefreshing sleep and is associated with daytime consequences. Although insomnia is typically secondary to a medical, psychiatric, circadian, or sleep disorder, it can also be a primary disorder. Primary insomnia is estimated to occur in 25% of all chronic insomnia patients. It is hypothesized to be a disorder of hyperarousal, which has been supported by research on the autonomic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function. Chronic insomnia is prevalent in 10% of the adult population. Age, sex, medical and psychiatric disease, and shift work all represent an increased risk of chronic insomnia. The morbidity of insomnia varies as a function of etiology. While transient insomnia produces sleepiness and impairment in psychomotor performance, chronic insomnia is associated with absenteeism, frequent accidents, memory impairment, and greater health care utilization. The most consistent impact of insomnia is a high risk of depression.

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This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog.