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Assessment of strength, flexibility, and running mechanics in men with iliotibial band syndrome

PainSci » bibliography » Noehren et al 2014
updated

Two articles on PainSci cite Noehren 2014: 1. The Complete Guide to IT Band Syndrome2. Does Hip Strengthening Work for IT Band Syndrome?

original abstract Abstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional laboratory study.

OBJECTIVES: To assess differences in hip strength, iliotibial band length, and hip and knee mechanics during running between male runners with iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) and healthy controls.

BACKGROUND: Flexibility, strength, and running mechanics are commonly assessed in patients with ITBS. However, these variables have not been evaluated concurrently in this population.

METHODS: Thirty-four men participated (17 healthy, 17 ITBS). Hip strength was measured with a handheld dynamometer, and iliotibial band length was assessed using an inclinometer while performing the Ober test. Kinetic and 3-D kinematic data were obtained during running. Kinematic variables of interest included frontal and transverse plane hip and knee joint angles during early stance. Independent-samples t tests, as well as effect sizes, were used to assess group differences.

RESULTS: Compared to the control group, persons with ITBS had a significantly lower Ober measurement (1.2°), weaker hip external rotators (1.2 Nm/kg), greater hip internal rotation (3.7°), and greater knee adduction (3.6°). However, only hip internal rotation and knee adduction exceeded the minimal detectable difference value.

CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that intervention strategies that target neuromuscular control of the hip and knee may be indicated for males with ITBS.

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