PainScience.com Sensible advice for aches, pains & injuries
 
 
bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, McKinney 1989.

Early mobilization and outcome in acute sprains of the neck

updated
Tags: neck, injury, head, exercise, head/neck, spine, pain problems, self-treatment, treatment

PainSci summary of McKinney 1989?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for typical studies with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

From the abstract: “Advice to mobilise in the early phase after neck injury reduces the number of patients with symptoms at two years and is superior to manipulative physiotherapy. Prolonged wearing of a collar is associated with persistence of symptoms.”

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

OBJECTIVE: To assess the long term effect of early mobilisation exercises in patients with acute sprains of the neck after road accidents.

DESIGN: Single blind randomised prospective study of patients receiving physiotherapy, advice on mobilisation, or on an initial period of rest followed up after two years by postal questionnaire.

SETTING: Accident and emergency department in urban hospital.

PATIENTS: 247 Consecutive patients (mean age at injury 30.6 years) presenting within 48 hours after injury with no pre-existing disease of the neck or serious skeletal injury. Of these, 167 patients responded to the questionnaire; 77 who responded but had not completed their treatment or review course were included in the analysis as a fourth group (non-attenders).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Presence of symptoms after two years.

RESULTS: Of the 167 patients (68%) responding, the percentage of patients still with symptoms was not significantly different in those receiving rest or physiotherapy (46%, 12/26 v 44%, 24/54), but that in those receiving advice on early mobilisation was significantly lower (23%, 11/48, p = 0.02). Of the 104 patients without symptoms, 94 (90%) recovered within six months and 62 (60%) within three months. Patients without symptoms who received advice or physiotherapy wore a collar for a significantly shorter time than those with persistent symptoms (mean duration 1.4 (SD 0.7) months v 2.8 (1.6) months, p = 0.005 and 1.6 (1.1) months v 1.8 (1.3) months, p = 0.006 respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: Advice to mobilise in the early phase after neck injury reduces the number of patients with symptoms at two years and is superior to manipulative physiotherapy. Prolonged wearing of a collar is associated with persistence of symptoms.

related content

These three articles on PainScience.com cite McKinney 1989 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: