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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Martens 1989.

Surgical treatment of the iliotibial band friction syndrome

updated
Martens M, Libbrecht P, Burssens A. Surgical treatment of the iliotibial band friction syndrome. Am J Sports Med. 1989;17(5):651–654.
Tags: IT band pain, running, knee, surgery, leg, limbs, pain problems, overuse injury, injury, exercise, self-treatment, treatment, tendinosis

PainSci summary of Martens 1989?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for typical studies with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

From the abstract: “… good results, low morbidity, and quick return to sports demonstrate that this type of surgery offers a solution for selected cases of failed prolonged conservative treatment.”

original abstract

A selected group of 23 patients underwent surgery for iliotibial band friction syndrome. Among the patients presenting with this exertional pain syndrome were runners, football players, and cyclists. Diagnosis was clinical since radiographs were negative and an ultrasound examination was positive in only one case, showing an aberrant picture around the lateral femoral epicondyle. Although conservative treatment is effective in most cases, an alternative is needed for patients with complaints that are resistant to conservative means. Surgery was done with the knee held in 60 degrees of flexion and consisted of a limited resection of a small triangular piece at the posterior part of the iliotibial band covering the lateral femoral epicondyle. The uniform good results, low morbidity, and quick return to sports demonstrate that this type of surgery offers a solution for selected cases of failed prolonged conservative treatment.

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This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: