PainScience.com • Good advice for aches, pains & injuries

Does exercise increase or decrease pain? Central mechanisms underlying these two phenomena

updated

Tags: chronic pain, exercise, pain problems, self-treatment, treatment

Two articles on PainSci cite Lima 2017: (1) The Complete Guide to Trigger Points & Myofascial Pain(2) A Rational Guide to Fibromyalgia

original abstract Abstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

Exercise is an integral part of the rehabilitation of patients suffering a variety of chronic musculoskeletal conditions, such as fibromyalgia, chronic low back pain and myofascial pain. Regular physical activity is recommended for treatment of chronic pain and its effectiveness has been established in clinical trials for people with a variety of pain conditions. However, exercise can also increase pain making participation in rehabilitation challenging for the person with pain. Animal models of exercise-induced pain have been developed and point to central mechanisms underlying this phenomena, such as increased activation of NMDA receptors in pain-modulating areas. Meanwhile, a variety of basic science studies testing different exercise protocols, show exercise-induced analgesia involves activation of central inhibitory pathways. Opioid, serotonin and NMDA mechanisms acting in rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) promote analgesia associated with exercise. This review explores and discusses current evidence on central mechanisms underlying exercised-induced pain and analgesia.

This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: