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The Pain & Therapy Bibliography, Record ID 0990 {show all records}

Field-expedient screening and injury risk algorithm categories as predictors of noncontact lower extremity injury


added Jul 17, 13, updated Nov 27, 14

summary

This looks like some positive evidence for the power of the FMS screen to predict injury. My money is still on the null, and I don’t think any of the other evidence to date is all that persuasive yet.

But if, in the end, good evidence says the screen works, then bully for FMS! Almost all my gripes with FMS concern over-reaching its stated purpose as a screen and using it as a diagnostic/prescriptive tool. If it does actually work as a screen, I will be the first in line to say, “Congratulations, FMS!”


item type
article in a journal
authors
M E Lehr, P J Plisky, R J Butler, M L Fink, K B Kiesel, and F B Underwood
pubmed
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23517071
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journal
Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports
year
2013
month
Aug
volume
23
number
4
pages
e225-32

abstract

Here’s some positive evidence for the power of the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) screen to predict injury, maybe. Or … maybe it was that other test? Importantly, the study was also a test of another screen (Y-balance). But it’s generally good news for screening, either one or both of the tests used. Nevertheless, my money is still on the null hypothesis — that ultimately nothing will come of this — and I don’t think any of the other evidence to date is all that persuasive yet. But if, in the end, good evidence says FMS (or any other screening) can predict injury, then bully for FMS! Most of my gripes with FMS concern egregious over-reaching its stated purpose as a screen, and using it as a diagnostic/prescriptive tool. If it does actually work as a screen, I will be the first in line to say, “Congratulations, FMS!” Truly. But I’m going to need some (more, better) hard data.