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Field-expedient screening and injury risk algorithm categories as predictors of noncontact lower extremity injury

added Jul 17, 13 • updated Nov 27, 14
Lehr ME, Plisky PJ, Butler RJ, Fink ML, Kiesel KB, Underwood FB. Field-expedient screening and injury risk algorithm categories as predictors of noncontact lower extremity injury. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2013 Aug;23(4):e225–32. PubMed #23517071.
Tags: exercise, patellar pain, IT band pain, strain, shin pain, self-treatment, treatment, arthritis, aging, pain problems, knee, leg, limbs, overuse injury, injury, running, tendinosis, muscle

PainSci summary of Lehr 2013 ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for average studies, with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

This looks like some positive evidence for the power of the FMS screen to predict injury. My money is still on the null, and I don’t think any of the other evidence to date is all that persuasive yet.

But if, in the end, good evidence says the screen works, then bully for FMS! Almost all my gripes with FMS concern over-reaching its stated purpose as a screen and using it as a diagnostic/prescriptive tool. If it does actually work as a screen, I will be the first in line to say, “Congratulations, FMS!”

original abstract

Here’s some positive evidence for the power of the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) screen to predict injury, maybe. Or … maybe it was that other test? Importantly, the study was also a test of another screen (Y-balance). But it’s generally good news for screening, either one or both of the tests used. Nevertheless, my money is still on the null hypothesis — that ultimately nothing will come of this — and I don’t think any of the other evidence to date is all that persuasive yet. But if, in the end, good evidence says FMS (or any other screening) can predict injury, then bully for FMS! Most of my gripes with FMS concern egregious over-reaching its stated purpose as a screen, and using it as a diagnostic/prescriptive tool. If it does actually work as a screen, I will be the first in line to say, “Congratulations, FMS!” Truly. But I’m going to need some (more, better) hard data.

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