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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Hoehler 1981.

Spinal manipulation for low back pain

updated
Hoehler FK, Tobis JS, Beurger AA. Spinal manipulation for low back pain. JAMA. 1981;245:1835–8.
Tags: back pain, chiropractic, spinal adjustment, pain problems, spine, manual therapy, treatment, controversy, debunkery

PainSci summary of Hoehler 1981?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible.

This study supports the usefulness of spinal adjustment for acute pain only. From the abstract: “Patients who received [spinal] manipulative treatment were much more likely to report immediate relief after the first treatment.” However, “at discharge there was no significant difference between the two groups because both showed substantial improvement.”

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

A randomized clinical trial of rotational manipulation was conducted on 95 patients with low back pain selected for (1) the absence of any contraindications for vertebral manipulation, (2) the absence of any psychosocial problems that might affect the outcome of treatment, (3) the absence of any previous experience with manipulative therapy, and (4) the presence of palpatory cues indicating that manipulation might be successful. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups: an experimental group receiving manipulation therapy and a control group receiving soft-tissue massage. Comparison of the two groups indicated that (1) patients who received manipulative treatment were much more likely to report immediate relief after the first treatment, and (2) at discharge, there was no significant difference between the two groups because both showed substantial improvement.

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One article on PainScience.com cites Hoehler 1981 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: