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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Hadler 1987.

A benefit of spinal manipulation as adjunctive therapy for acute low back pain: a stratified controlled trial

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Tags: back pain, chiropractic, spinal adjustment, pain problems, spine, manual therapy, treatment, controversy, debunkery

PainSci summary of Hadler 1987?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★★★?5-star ratings are for sentinel studies, excellent experiments with meaningful results. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

From the abstract, “In the first week following [spinal] manipulation, these patients improved to a greater degree ... and more rapidly ....”

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

Fifty-four subjects volunteered to participate in a controlled study contrasting spinal manipulation with spinal mobilization without the rotational forces and leverage required to move facet joints. All suffered from regional low-back pain for less than 1 month, were ages 18-40, had never previously undergone any form of spinal manipulation, and denied a prior episode of backache within the previous 6 months. Randomization was stratified at outset into those who suffered for less than 2 weeks and those whose discomfort had persisted for 2-4 weeks. Outcome was monitored by a questionnaire assessing functional impairment. A treatment effect of manipulation was demonstrated only in the strata with more prolonged illness at entry. In the first week following manipulation, these patients improved to a greater degree (P = .009, t test) and more rapidly (P less than .025, Wilcoxon rank-sum test).

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This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: