PainScience.com Sensible advice for aches, pains & injuries
 
 
bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Fernández-de-Las-Peñas 2010.

Referred pain from muscle trigger points in the masticatory and neck-shoulder musculature in women with temporomandibular disoders

updated
Fernández-de-Las-Peñas C, Galán-Del-Río F, Alonso-Blanco C, Jiménez-García R, Arendt-Nielsen L, Svensson P. Referred pain from muscle trigger points in the masticatory and neck-shoulder musculature in women with temporomandibular disoders. J Pain. 2010 Dec;11(12):1295–304. PubMed #20494623.
Tags: muscle pain, etiology, chronic pain, random, muscle, pain problems, pro

PainSci summary of Fernández-de-Las-Peñas 2010?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focussed on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★★☆?4-star ratings are for larger and better studies and reviews published in more prestigious journals, with only quibbles. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

This study compared 25 healthy women to 25 others with temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Trained examiners looked for trigger points (without knowing which group they were in), specifically in the neck and jaw muscles. According to the criteria they used, they found more and worse trigger points in the women with TMD (where by “worse” I mean larger areas of referred pain). The trigger points in the neck produced more referred pain that those in the jaw muscles.

original abstract

Our aim was to describe the referred pain patterns and size of areas of trigger points (TrPs) in the masticatory and neck-shoulder muscles of women with myofascial temporomandibular disorders (TMD). Twenty-five women with myofascial TMD and 25 healthy matched women participated. Bilateral temporalis, deep masseter, superficial masseter, sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius and suboccipital muscles were examined for TrPs by an assessor blinded to the subjects' condition. TrPs were identified with manual palpation and categorized into active and latent according to proposed criteria. The referred pain areas were drawn on anatomical maps, digitalized, and measured. The occurrence of active (P < .001) and latent TrPs (P = .04) were different between groups. In all muscles, there were significantly more active and latent TrP in patients than controls (P < .001). Significant differences in referred pain areas between groups (P < .001) and muscles (P < .001) were found: the referred pain areas were larger in patients (P < .001), and the referred pain area elicited by suboccipital TrPs was greater than the referred pain from other TrPs (P < .001). Referred pain areas from neck TrPs were greater than the pain areas from masticatory muscle TrPs (P < .01). Referred pain areas of masticatory TrPs were not different (P > .703). The local and referred pain elicited from active TrPs in the masticatory and neck-shoulder muscles shared similar pain pattern as spontaneous TMD, which supports the concept of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in myofascial TMD.

PERSPECTIVE: The current study showed the existence of multiple active muscle TrPs in the masticatory and neck-shoulder muscles in women with myofascial TMD pain. The local and referred pain elicited from active TrPs reproduced pain complaints in these patients. Further, referred pain areas were larger in TMD pain patients than in healthy controls. The results are also in accordance with the notion of peripheral and central sensitization mechanisms in patients with myofascial TMD.

related content

These two articles on PainScience.com cite Fernández-de-Las-Peñas 2010 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog.