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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Edwards 2005.

A practical approach for the differential diagnosis of chronic leg pain in the athlete

updated
Edwards PH, Wright ML, Hartman JF. A practical approach for the differential diagnosis of chronic leg pain in the athlete. Am J Sports Med. 2005 Aug;33(8):1241–1249. PubMed #16061959.
Tags: diagnosis, shin pain, running, leg, limbs, pain problems, overuse injury, injury, exercise, self-treatment, treatment

PainSci summary of Edwards 2005?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for typical studies with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

A discussion of causes of chronic leg pain in athletes, including “various conditions, most commonly, medial tibial stress syndrome, stress fracture, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, nerve entrapment, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome. Symptoms associated with these conditions often overlap, making a definitive diagnosis difficult.”

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

Chronic lower leg pain results from various conditions, most commonly, medial tibial stress syndrome, stress fracture, chronic exertional compartment syndrome, nerve entrapment, and popliteal artery entrapment syndrome. Symptoms associated with these conditions often overlap, making a definitive diagnosis difficult. As a result, an algorithmic approach was created to aid in the evaluation of patients with complaints of lower leg pain and to assist in defining a diagnosis by providing recommended diagnostic studies for each condition. A comprehensive physical examination is imperative to confirm a diagnosis and should begin with an inquiry regarding the location and onset of the patient's pain and tenderness. Confirmation of the diagnosis requires performing the appropriate diagnostic studies, including radiographs, bone scans, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance angiography, compartmental pressure measurements, and arteriograms. Although most conditions causing lower leg pain are treated successfully with nonsurgical management, some syndromes, such as popliteal artery entrapment syndrome, may require surgical intervention. Regardless of the form of treatment, return to activity must be gradual and individualized for each patient to prevent future athletic injury.

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This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: