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Does cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapy alter dysfunctional beliefs about sleep?

PainSci » bibliography » Edinger et al 2001
updated
Tags: mind, sleep

One article on PainSci cites Edinger 2001: The Insomnia Guide

PainSci notes on Edinger 2001:

From the abstract: “[Cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapy] is effective for reducing dysfunctional beliefs about sleep and such changes are associated with other positive outcomes in insomnia treatment.”

original abstract Abstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to exam the degree to which cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapy (CBT) reduces dysfunctional beliefs about sleep and to determine if such cognitive changes correlate with sleep improvements.

DESIGN: The study used a double-blind, placebo-controlled design in which participants were randomized to CBT, progressive muscle relaxation training or a sham behavioral intervention. Each treatment was provided in 6 weekly, 30-60-minute individual therapy sessions.

SETTING: The sleep disorders center of a large university medical center.

PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-five individuals (ages 40 to 80 years of age) who met strict criteria for persistent primary sleep-maintenance insomnia were enrolled in this trial.

INTERVENTIONS: N/A.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Participants completed the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes About Sleep (DBAS) Scale, as well as other assessment procedures before treatment, shortly after treatment, and at a six-month follow-up. Items composing a factor-analytically derived DBAS short form (DBAS-SF) were then used to compare treatment groups across time points. Results showed CBT produced larger changes on the DBAS-SF than did the other treatments, and these changes endured through the follow-up period. Moreover, these cognitive changes were correlated with improvements noted on both objective and subjective measures of insomnia symptoms, particularly within the CBT group.

CONCLUSIONS: CBT is effective for reducing dysfunctional beliefs about sleep and such changes are associated with other positive outcomes in insomnia treatment.

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