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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Edinger 2001.

Does cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapy alter dysfunctional beliefs about sleep?

updated
Edinger JD, Wohlgemuth WK, Radtke RA, Marsh GR, Quillian RE. Does cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapy alter dysfunctional beliefs about sleep? Sleep. 2001;24(5):591–599. PubMed #11480656.
Tags: sleep, mind

PainSci summary of Edinger 2001?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★★☆?4-star ratings are for bigger/better studies and reviews published in more prestigious journals, with only quibbles. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

From the abstract: “[Cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapy] is effective for reducing dysfunctional beliefs about sleep and such changes are associated with other positive outcomes in insomnia treatment.”

original abstract

OBJECTIVES: This study was conducted to exam the degree to which cognitive-behavioral insomnia therapy (CBT) reduces dysfunctional beliefs about sleep and to determine if such cognitive changes correlate with sleep improvements.

DESIGN: The study used a double-blind, placebo-controlled design in which participants were randomized to CBT, progressive muscle relaxation training or a sham behavioral intervention. Each treatment was provided in 6 weekly, 30-60-minute individual therapy sessions.

SETTING: The sleep disorders center of a large university medical center.

PARTICIPANTS: Seventy-five individuals (ages 40 to 80 years of age) who met strict criteria for persistent primary sleep-maintenance insomnia were enrolled in this trial.

INTERVENTIONS: N/A.

MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Participants completed the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes About Sleep (DBAS) Scale, as well as other assessment procedures before treatment, shortly after treatment, and at a six-month follow-up. Items composing a factor-analytically derived DBAS short form (DBAS-SF) were then used to compare treatment groups across time points. Results showed CBT produced larger changes on the DBAS-SF than did the other treatments, and these changes endured through the follow-up period. Moreover, these cognitive changes were correlated with improvements noted on both objective and subjective measures of insomnia symptoms, particularly within the CBT group.

CONCLUSIONS: CBT is effective for reducing dysfunctional beliefs about sleep and such changes are associated with other positive outcomes in insomnia treatment.

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This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog.