PainScience.com Sensible advice for aches, pains & injuries
 
 
bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, DiFrancisco-Donoghue 2007.

Comparison of once-weekly and twice-weekly strength training in older adults

updated
DiFrancisco-Donoghue J, Werner W, Douris PC. Comparison of once-weekly and twice-weekly strength training in older adults. Br J Sports Med. 2007 Jan;41(1):19–22. PubMed #17062657.
Tags: exercise, self-treatment, treatment

PainSci summary of DiFrancisco-Donoghue 2007?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for typical studies with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

DiFrancisco-Donoghue et al tested 18 older adults in two groups for several weeks. Half of them trained twice per week, the other half once. Once again, they found no difference at all.

One set of exercises performed once weekly to muscle fatigue improved strength as well as twice a week in the older adult. Our results provide information that will assist in designing strength-training programmes that are more time and cost efficient in producing health and fitness benefits for older adults.

~ Paul Ingraham

original abstract

BACKGROUND: Strength training has been shown to benefit the health and function of older adults.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether one set of exercises performed once a week was as effective in increasing muscle strength as training twice a week.

METHODS: 18 subjects (7 women and 11 men) aged 65-79 years were randomly assigned to two groups. Both groups performed one set of exercises to muscular fatigue; group 1 trained 1 day/week and group 2 trained 2 days/week on three lower and three upper body exercises for 9 weeks. The data were analysed using a mixed model 2 x 2 analysis of variance.

RESULTS: A significant main effect of time (p<0.001), but not group, on one-repetition maximum scores was observed. No significant interaction was observed between time and group and therefore no difference in strength changes between training once a week versus twice a week after 9 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS: One set of exercises performed once weekly to muscle fatigue improved strength as well as twice a week in the older adult. Our results provide information that will assist in designing strength-training programmes that are more time and cost efficient in producing health and fitness benefits for older adults.

related content

One article on PainScience.com cites DiFrancisco-Donoghue 2007 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog.