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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Davis 2016.

Greater vertical impact loading in female runners with medically diagnosed injuries: a prospective investigation

updated
Tags: etiology, movement, running, injury, biomechanics, pro, exercise, self-treatment, treatment, pain problems

PainSci summary of Davis 2016?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★★☆?4-star ratings are for bigger/better studies and reviews published in more prestigious journals, with only quibbles. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

250 female runners recorded their injuries every month for a year after extensive gait analysis. 103 sought medical attention for injuries. In those injured runners, impact-related variables were significantly and substantially higher (effect size ~0.5).

original abstract

BACKGROUND: Running has been critical to human survival. Therefore, the high rate of injuries experienced by modern day runners is puzzling. Landing on the heel, as most modern day shod runners do, results in a distinct vertical impact force that has been shown to be associated with running-related injuries. However, these injury studies were retrospective in nature and do not establish cause and effect.

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether runners with high impacts are at greater risk for developing medically diagnosed injuries.

METHODS: 249 female runners underwent a gait analysis to measure vertical instantaneous loading rate, vertical average loading rate (VALR), vertical impact peak (VIP) and peak vertical force. Participants then recorded their mileage and any running-related injuries monthly in a web-based, database programme. Variables were first compared between the entire injured (INJ; n=144) and uninjured (n=105) groups. However, the focus of this study was on those injured runners seeking medical attention (n=103) and those who had never injured (n=21).

RESULTS: There were no differences between the entire group of injured and uninjured groups. However, all impact-related variables were higher in those with medically diagnosed injuries compared with those who had never been injured. (effect size (ES) 0.4-0.59). When VALR was>66.0 body weight (BW)/s, the odds of being DX_INJ were 2.72 (95% CI 1.0 to 7.4). Impact loading was associated with bony and soft-tissue injuries.

CONCLUSIONS: Vertical average loading rate was lower in female runners classified as 'never injured' compared with those who had been injured and sought medical attention.

related content

These two articles on PainScience.com cite Davis 2016 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: