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The trigger point therapy workbook: your self-treatment guide for pain relief


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summary

In this articulate passage, Clair Davies discusses some patterns he has observed in private practice as a massage therapist. My experience has been identical.


item type
a page in a book
author
Clair Davies
 
Buy this book from
publisher
New Harbinger Publications
year
2001
page
p. 13 (1st edition)

excerpt

Interestingly, almost all the people who came to me had some kind of back pain along with whatever other pain complaint they had. Their previous treatments for back pain had always focused on the spine. I heard about injections of papaya or cortisone. People had usually been told they had arthritis or bad disks, or that their cartilage had been worn away. They’d been shown X-rays [or MRIs! — PI] that purported to prove it. Some had already had surgery, and frequently had as much pain after surgery as before. Typically, the surgeon’s last word was always that he was sorry but he’d done all he could. Then he’d renew their prescription for painkillers and dump them off on a physical therapist. I heard these stories over and over again. And over and over, I found that trigger point therapy gave them the relief they’d been seeking for so long. Had trigger points been the problem in the first place? Arthritis? Bad disks? In Travell and Simons’ Myofascial Pain and Dysfunction, I had read that you can have herniated disks and arthritis of the spine and still find that myofascial trigger points are the primary cause of your back pain.

related content

  1. PS Review of The Trigger Point Therapy Workbook — A popular book that promises too much and ignores recent science and controversies, which alienates many physicians and sets patients up for disappointment
  2. The trigger point therapy workbook: your self-treatment guide for pain relief (book), by Clair Davies and Amber Davies.

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