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Efficacy of Whole-Body Vibration Board Training on Strength in Athletes After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: A Randomized Controlled Study

PainSci » bibliography » Costantino et al 2018
updated

One article on PainSci cites Costantino 2018: Vibration Therapies, from Massage Guns to Jacuzzis


Common issues and characteristics relevant to this paper: ?Scientific papers have many common characteristics, flaws, and limitations, and many of these are rarely or never acknowledged in the paper itself, or even by other reviewers. I have reviewed thousands of papers, and described many of these issues literally hundreds of times. Eventually I got sick of repeating myself, and so now I just refer to a list common characteristics, especially flaws. Not every single one of them applies perfectly to every paper, but if something is listed here, it is relevant in some way. Note that in the case of reviews, the issue may apply to the science being reviewed, and not the review itself.

  1. Damned with faint praise — technically positive results (at least partially) that don’t actually impress.

original abstract Abstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether an 8-week whole-body vibration training program may improve recovery of knee flexion/extension muscular strength in athletes after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Single outpatient rehabilitation center. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-eight female volleyball/basketball players (aged between 20 and 30), randomized into 2 treatment groups. INTERVENTIONS: During a standardized six-month rehabilitation program, from week 13 to week 20 after surgery, the whole-body vibration group (n = 19) and the control group (n = 19) performed additional static knee flexor/extensor exercises on a vibration platform. For the whole-body vibration group, the vibration platform was set to 2.5 mm of amplitude and 26 Hz of frequency. The control group followed the same whole-body vibration board training with no vibrations. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: All patients were evaluated using an isokinetic strength test with a Biodex dynamometer at the beginning and at the end of the additional treatment protocol. The parameters tested were the peak torque and the maximum power of knee flexor and extensor muscles performing strength and endurance tests. RESULTS: No vibration-related side effects were observed. Improvements were noticed in both groups, but increase in knee muscle isokinetic strength values was statistically significant in the whole-body vibration group when compared with the control group (differences in extension: peak torque 11.316/10.263 N·m and maximum power 13.684/11.211 W; flexion: peak torque 9.632/11.105 N·m and maximum power 10.158/9.474 W; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: When combined with a standardized rehabilitation program, whole-body vibration may increase muscular strength and be an effective additional treatment option in the rehabilitation of athletes after ACL arthroscopic reconstruction.

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