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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Barrett 2016.

Is thoracic spine posture associated with shoulder pain, range of motion and function? A systematic review

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Barrett E, O'Keeffe M, O'Sullivan K, Lewis J, McCreesh K. Is thoracic spine posture associated with shoulder pain, range of motion and function? A systematic review. Man Ther. 2016 Dec;26:38–46. PubMed #27475532.
Tags: etiology, biomechanics, shoulder, pro, head/neck

PainSci summary of Barrett 2016?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for typical studies with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

This is a review of ten scientific studies of the relationship between shoulder pain and thoracic spine posture, specifically kyphosis, the slouched or “hunchback” upper back curvature widely assumed to be a cause of pain. Six of the studies were judged to have a moderate to high risk of bias. Collectively these studies produced “moderate” evidence of no relationship: that is, there’s “no significant difference in thoracic kyphosis between groups with and without shoulder pain.” One study (with a high risk of bias) contradicted the others, identifying more kyphosis in people with shoulder pain. There is strong evidence that shoulder movement is greater if you’re straighter.

~ Paul Ingraham

original abstract

INTRODUCTION: Excessive thoracic kyphosis is considered a predisposing factor for shoulder pain, though there is uncertainty about the nature of the relationship between shoulder pain and thoracic spine posture. The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the relationship between thoracic kyphosis and shoulder pain, shoulder range of motion (ROM) and function.

METHODS: Two reviewers independently searched eight electronic databases and identified relevant studies by applying eligibility criteria. Sources of bias were assessed independently by two reviewers using a previously validated tool (Ijaz et al., 2013). Data were synthesised using a level of evidence approach (van Tulder et al., 2003).

RESULTS: Ten studies were included. Four studies were rated as low risk of bias, three at moderate risk of bias and three at high risk of bias. There is a moderate level of evidence of no significant difference in thoracic kyphosis between groups with and without shoulder pain. One study at high risk of bias demonstrated significantly greater thoracic kyphosis in people with shoulder pain (p < 0.05). There is a strong level of evidence that maximum shoulder ROM is greater in erect postures compared to slouched postures (p < 0.001), in people with and without shoulder pain.

CONCLUSIONS: Thoracic kyphosis may not be an important contributor to the development of shoulder pain. While there is evidence that reducing thoracic kyphosis facilitates greater shoulder ROM, this is based on single-session studies whose long-term clinical relevance is unclear. Higher quality research is warranted to fully explore the role of thoracic posture in shoulder pain.

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This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog.