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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Boling 2009.

Weakness in hips associated with patellofemoral pain in 20 people

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Tags: knee, patellar pain, biomechanics, exercise, etiology, leg, limbs, pain problems, arthritis, aging, overuse injury, injury, running, self-treatment, treatment, pro

PainSci summary of Boling 2009?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★☆☆☆?2-star ratings are for studies with flaws, bias, and/or conflict of interest; published in lesser journals. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

Twenty patients with patellofemoral pain were tested and found to have “weakness in eccentric hip abduction and hip external rotation.” The weakness could be either a symptom of knee pain and/or a cause of it: this study was designed only to attempt to detect the correlation, and is too tiny to do even that convincingly, much like a previous paper from this author (see Boling 2006).

~ Paul Ingraham

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

CONTEXT: Individuals suffering from patellofemoral pain have previously been reported to have decreased isometric strength of the hip musculature; however, no researchers have investigated concentric and eccentric torque of the hip musculature in individuals with patellofemoral pain.

OBJECTIVE: To compare concentric and eccentric torque of the hip musculature in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain.

DESIGN: Case control.

SETTING: Research laboratory.

PATIENTS OR OTHER PARTICIPANTS: Twenty participants with patellofemoral pain (age = 26.8 +/- 4.5 years, height = 171.8 +/- 8.4 cm, mass = 72.4 +/- 16.8 kg) and 20 control participants (age = 25.6 +/- 2.8 years, height = 169.5 +/- 8.9 cm, mass = 70.0 +/- 16.9 kg) were tested. Volunteers with patellofemoral pain met the following criteria: knee pain greater than or equal to 3 cm on a 10-cm visual analog scale, insidious onset of symptoms not related to trauma, pain with palpation of the patellar facets, and knee pain during 2 of the following activities: stair climbing, jumping or running, squatting, kneeling, or prolonged sitting. Control participants were excluded if they had a prior history of patellofemoral pain, knee surgery in the past 2 years, or current lower extremity injury that limited participation in physical activity.

INTERVENTION(S): Concentric and eccentric torque of the hip musculature was measured on an isokinetic dynamometer. All volunteers performed 5 repetitions of each strength test. Separate multivariate analyses of variance were performed to compare concentric and eccentric torque of the hip extensors, abductors, and external rotators between groups.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Average and peak concentric and eccentric torque of the hip extensors, abductors, and external rotators. Torque measures were normalized to the participant's body weight multiplied by height.

RESULTS: The patellofemoral pain group was weaker than the control group for peak eccentric hip abduction torque (F(1,38) = 6.630, P = .014), and average concentric (F(1,38) = 4.156, P = .048) and eccentric (F(1,38) = 4.963, P = .032) hip external rotation torque.

CONCLUSIONS: The patellofemoral pain group displayed weakness in eccentric hip abduction and hip external rotation, which may allow for increased hip adduction and internal rotation during functional movements.

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This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: