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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Tiggelen 2009.

Slow quadriceps activation and patellofemoral pain

updated
Tags: etiology, knee, patellar pain, running, biomechanics, pro, leg, limbs, pain problems, arthritis, aging, overuse injury, injury, exercise, self-treatment, treatment

PainSci summary of Tiggelen 2009?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★★☆☆?3-star ratings are for typical studies with no more (or less) than the usual common problems. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

According to past research, PFPS subjects usually have “an altered firing order of the vastus medialis and the vastus lateralis muscles compared with healthy subjects during a functional task.” The study, done with military subjects, also determined that “Delayed onset of electromyographic activity of the vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis is one of the contributing risk factors to the development of patellofemoral pain.”

However, there is no indication of what to do about this.

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

BACKGROUND: Delayed onset of vastus medialis obliquus activity has been described in patellofemoral pain patients. No prospective study investigating the development of patellofemoral pain has tested the onset timing of electromyographic activity of the vastus medialis obliquus and vastus lateralis muscles during a functional task.

HYPOTHESIS: Before the development of patellofemoral pain, subjects demonstrate an altered firing order of the vastus medialis obliquus and vastus lateralis muscles compared with healthy subjects during a functional task.

STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2.

METHODS: The onset of vastus medialis obliquus and vastus lateralis activity was measured with surface electromyography during a functional task (rocking back on the heels) in 79 healthy subjects subsequently submitted to a 6-week strenuous basic military training. Afterward, these subjects were reassessed.

RESULTS: Thirty-two percent of the recruits developed patellofemoral pain during training. Patellofemoral pain subjects demonstrated a significant delay of onset of vastus medialis obliquus electromyographic activity compared with the healthy controls (P = .023), even before basic military training. In healthy subjects, no significant differences in electromyographic activity onset of the vastus medialis obliquus compared with the vastus lateralis could be identified before and after basic military training. A significant (P < .001) delay could be demonstrated in the patellofemoral pain group after basic military training. A binary logistic regression could be constructed wherein the onset of the electromyographic activity of the vastus medialis obliquus and vastus lateralis was withheld in the model. The most optimal cutoff value, which is based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, is a timing difference of -0.67 milliseconds (vastus medialis obliquus - vastus lateralis). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve is considered as fair (0.68).

CONCLUSION: Delayed onset of electromyographic activity of the vastus medialis obliquus-vastus lateralis is one of the contributing risk factors to the development of patellofemoral pain.


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: