PainScience.com Sensible advice for aches, pains & injuries
 
 
bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Wand 2011.

Sensorimotor retraining for low back pain promising in tiny trial

updated
Tags: back pain, treatment, chronic pain, exercise, mind, pain problems, spine, self-treatment

PainSci summary of Wand 2011?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★☆☆☆?2-star ratings are for studies with flaws, bias, and/or conflict of interest; published in lesser journals. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

This is a tiny study: only three people! They were assessed weekly during a no-treatment period and then during a 10-week retraining program. Data was collected for at least a month after the end of the formal treatment.

While “pain intensity, pain interference, and disability all were reduced, and the improvements were maintained throughout the follow-up period,”

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

BACKGROUND: Current approaches to the management of chronic nonspecific low back pain (CNSLBP) have shown limited effectiveness. It appears that disruption of cortical structure and function is a feature of CNSLBP and that these changes may contribute to current treatment failures. Sensorimotor retraining approaches have been shown to be effective in the management of other long-standing pain problems that are characterized by cortical dysfunction. Similar treatments may be an option for people with CNSLBP.

OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to describe the effects of participation in a graded sensorimotor retraining program on pain intensity, interference of pain with daily life (pain interference), and self-reported disability and to evaluate the safety of the program.

DESIGN: A multiple-baseline, replicated, single-case design was used for this study.

METHODS: Three people with disabling CNSLBP were assessed weekly during a no-treatment baseline period. Each person then participated in a graded sensorimotor retraining program for a minimum of 10 weeks, during which clinical status was assessed weekly. Data collection continued weekly for 1 month after the end of formal treatment.

RESULTS: Pain intensity, pain interference, and disability all were reduced, and the improvements were maintained throughout the follow-up period. No adverse reactions to treatment were reported.

LIMITATIONS: The findings are preliminary and were based on a single-case design. The observed improvements in clinical status may have been attributable to the effects of factors other than treatment, such as the effect of time and other, nonspecific effects.

CONCLUSIONS: Positive outcomes were reported for 3 participants with CNSLBP after the completion of a graded sensorimotor retraining program. However, the findings are only preliminary and require replication with more-robust study designs.


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: