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bibliography * The PainScience Bibliography contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers and others sources, like a specialized blog. This page is about a single scientific paper in the bibliography, Balachandar 2011.

Patellar taping efficacy for patellofemoral pain syndrome, review

updated
Tags: patellar pain, treatment, devices, running, arthritis, aging, pain problems, knee, leg, limbs, overuse injury, injury, exercise, self-treatment

PainSci summary of Balachandar 2011?This page is one of thousands in the PainScience.com bibliography. It is not a general article: it is focused on a single scientific paper, and it may provide only just enough context for the summary to make sense. Links to other papers and more general information are provided at the bottom of the page, as often as possible. ★★☆☆☆?2-star ratings are for studies with flaws, bias, and/or conflict of interest; published in lesser journals. Ratings are a highly subjective opinion, and subject to revision at any time. If you think this paper has been incorrectly rated, please let me know.

Does taping help patellar pain syndrome? This review looked at the results of quite a few studies (like Hinman 2003) and concluded that “patellar taping provides an effective means of pain relief in PFPS in the immediate term.” But how does it work? Unfortunately “there is a paucity of research evaluating the effects of patellar taping on PFJ kinematics.”

original abstractAbstracts here may not perfectly match originals, for a variety of technical and practical reasons. Some abstacts are truncated for my purposes here, if they are particularly long-winded and unhelpful. I occasionally add clarifying notes. And I make some minor corrections.

Pain reduction through patella taping has been hypothesised to be achieved via changes to neuromuscular control and/or patellofemoral joint (PFJ) kinematics. Considering the high number of recent publications, a systematic review and meta-analysis evaluating the effects of patellar taping on pain, neuromuscular control and PFJ kinematics is warranted. MEDLINE, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and EMBASE databases were searched from inception until February 2011 for randomised studies evaluating the effects of patellar taping on pain, neuromuscular control, and/or PFJ kinematics in individuals with PFPS. All potential publications were assessed by 2 independent reviewers for inclusion and quality using the Downs and Black Quality Index. Ten studies were included for final review. Two studies investigated medium to longer term effects of taping on pain (4 to 52 weeks), and eight studies investigated the immediate effects of taping on pain, neuromuscular control, and/or PFJ kinematics. Effect size calculations showed that perceived pain was reduced at four weeks by medially directed taping in combination with exercise. In the immediate term, medially directed patellar taping reduced pain during functional tasks. Patellar taping was found to reduce vastus medialis (VMO) to vastus lateralis (VL) ratio, and produce earlier vastus medialis oblique (VMO) activation. Patellar taping provides an effective means of pain relief in PFPS in the immediate term. Additionally, further high quality randomised trials with long term follow-up evaluating the efficacy of patellar taping as an adjunct or alternative treatment to other evidence based interventions is needed. Possible neuromuscular mechanisms behind patellar taping efficacy may be reduced levels and earlier onsets of VMO activity. There is a paucity of research evaluating the effects of patellar taping on PFJ kinematics.

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One article on PainScience.com cites Balachandar 2011 as a source:


This page is part of the PainScience BIBLIOGRAPHY, which contains plain language summaries of thousands of scientific papers & others sources. It’s like a highly specialized blog. A few highlights: